Young Roma children status in Bosnia and Herzegovina | INFOGRAPHIC

Young Roma children status in Bosnia and Herzegovina | INFOGRAPHIC

The overall results of the REYN Early Childhood Research Study in Bosnia and Herzegovina are represented in this infographic, showing at a glance the status of young Roma children in the country.

Data collected in interviews with Roma families with young children, and professionals working with them show the high levels of discrimination that young Roma children are still facing, and their situation according to key areas that impact the child’s development:

* family and living environment

* health and well-being

* safety and security

* early learning

* responsive parenting.

Print infographic

How to guarantee that the European Child Guarantee efficiently tackles Roma children’s poverty and inequality gap?

This European Network on Roma Inclusion (EURoma Network) reference document identifies critical aspects to consider in the context of the Child Guarantee National Action Plans and of the 2021-2027 programming period of the European Cohesion Policy Funds 2021-2027 (notably ESF+ and ERDF) in order to guarantee that they contribute to efficiently tackle the poverty and inequality gap currently faced by Roma children.

The explicit mention of Roma children as one of the groups facing particular disadvantages and, therefore, requiring special attention, in a mainstream instrument such as the Child Guarantee is an important step forward and and opportunity that should not be missed. It acknowledges the particular levels of inequality and disadvantage that this group faces across the EU and the need for a targeted commitment.

#DreamToGrow

When it comes to policies, strategies, and programs that support the inclusion of the most vulnerable and marginalized children, we cannot fail to consider the early childhood development (ECD) professionals with the same cultural and ethnic backgrounds as the children with whom they work.

The Dream to Grow campaign shares 12 multipurpose advocacy stories, highlighting  the successes of Roma ECD professionals who are supporting Roma children and families in their countries – celebrating the example they are setting for future generations.

These inspiring stories highlight Roma ECD professionals’ different pathways to become who they are today, following Roma standing with dignity and pride, ready to shape Europe’s future, and rewrite the current narrative.

REYN aims to contribute to creating more inclusive and equitable societies by advocating for increasing diversity in the ECD workforce, strengthening professionalism, and giving more recognition to the Roma ECD professionals for their invaluable work. In the quest to shape a better future for the new generations, there is a dire need to work closely with Roma professionals. Positive role models, such as Roma ECD professionals, break negative stereotypes in society in general, and for the children, they do that from the early years. They demonstrate that, with the right support and a nurtured belief in oneself, it is possible to break the vicious circle that has entrapped the Roma minority in Europe for centuries.

View resource

Key Data on Early Childhood Education and Care 2019

Only one third of children aged 0-3 has access to center-based early childhood education and care (ECEC) settings.

The report provides indicators on the key quality areas of governance, access, staff, educational guidelines as well as evaluation and monitoring. Cross-cutting these key areas, it presents a child-centered approach, with special attention being paid to the inter-relatedness of policies in different areas. The importance of inclusiveness in education is also stressed as high quality ECEC is considered to be one of the best ways to increase equity and equality in society.

Part one provides policymakers, researchers and parents with comparative information on the current ECEC policies across Europe. Part two gives an overview of the key features of national ECEC systems accompanied by a diagram of their structure.

The scope of the report is wide, covering center-based and regulated home-based provision in both the public and private sectors in the 38 European countries (43 education systems) participating in the EU’s Erasmus+ programme. It includes the 28 Member States of the European Union as well as Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Switzerland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Norway, Serbia and Turkey.

Mapping of research on Roma children in the European Union

This report addresses the acknowledged scarcity of quality, disaggregated, child focused data on Roma children which is widely seen to impede the development of positive policies and programmes promoting full realisation of their rights.

The countries that were selected for mapping on the basis of their estimated Roma population and their capacity to benefit from Roma related research included Albania; Belgium; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Bulgaria; the Czech Republic; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Ireland; Italy; Kosovo; Netherlands; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia and Spain. Seventy-four research areas were identified, divided into nine thematic areas – child protection; civil registration; discrimination; education; employment; health; housing; migration; and social protection.

Closing the life expectancy gap of Roma in Europe

A report by the European Public Health Alliance (EPHA) focuses on how socioeconomic preconditions affect the health of Roma in Europe. Infant mortality is reported to be between two to three times higher than majority population.

One in One Hundred: Drivers of Success and Resilience among College-Educated Romani Adolescents in Serbia

One in a hundred Roma makes it to University, why is that? The study One in One Hundred: Drivers of Success and Resilience among College-Educated Romani Adolescents in Serbia, is a collaboration between the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard University (Harvard FXB) and the CIP Center for Interactive Pedagogy in Belgrade. The research goes beyond the scrutiny of educational deficits and obstacles to find out what actually works.

Researchers studied the responses from surveys, interviews, and a “Writing Romani Lives” workshop conducted with 89 Romani adolescents who made it to college and 100 who did not. The findings showed that strong teacher and peer support systems, access to early childhood development services, and a high level of education among immediate family members corresponded to educational success.