Young Roma children status in Bosnia and Herzegovina | INFOGRAPHIC

Young Roma children status in Bosnia and Herzegovina | INFOGRAPHIC

The overall results of the REYN Early Childhood Research Study in Bosnia and Herzegovina are represented in this infographic, showing at a glance the status of young Roma children in the country.

Data collected in interviews with Roma families with young children, and professionals working with them show the high levels of discrimination that young Roma children are still facing, and their situation according to key areas that impact the child’s development:

* family and living environment

* health and well-being

* safety and security

* early learning

* responsive parenting.

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How to guarantee that the European Child Guarantee efficiently tackles Roma children’s poverty and inequality gap?

This European Network on Roma Inclusion (EURoma Network) reference document identifies critical aspects to consider in the context of the Child Guarantee National Action Plans and of the 2021-2027 programming period of the European Cohesion Policy Funds 2021-2027 (notably ESF+ and ERDF) in order to guarantee that they contribute to efficiently tackle the poverty and inequality gap currently faced by Roma children.

The explicit mention of Roma children as one of the groups facing particular disadvantages and, therefore, requiring special attention, in a mainstream instrument such as the Child Guarantee is an important step forward and and opportunity that should not be missed. It acknowledges the particular levels of inequality and disadvantage that this group faces across the EU and the need for a targeted commitment.

Toolkit for inclusive early childhood education and care. Providing high quality education and care to all young children

The Toolkit for inclusion in ECEC recalls political commitments made e.g. in the European Pillar of Social Rights, policy recommendations which have been adopted by EU Member States as well as research findings. They all converge towards the need and will to develop more inclusive ECEC systems and settings.

To ensure equity for all children in accessing and benefitting from ECEC, the toolkit includes a set of practical solutions and measures to inspire ECEC policy makers at the national, regional or local level, as well as ECEC practitioners. It includes examples of good practice in ECEC settings and identifies useful ideas and resources to inspire leaders and staff across Europe to progress towards practice that is more inclusive. The toolkit aims to inspire decision-makers to use the examples of good practice to create appropriate conditions that can benefit all children and families.

Early childhood education and care. How to recruit, train and motivate well-qualified staff: final report

This report focuses on recruitment and retention of ECEC staff, and examines the best ways to educate and train this staff, both through initial training and continuing professional development. It welcomes the fact that the vast majority of ECEC staff enjoy working with young children and know they make a very important contribution to children’s lives. However the sector is expanding, the expectations on staff are growing, and there are increasing opportunities to work with young children in a wider range of occupations. In this context, the report looks at how the ECEC sector can review its own practice and arrangements to ensure it attracts a sufficient number of well qualified and well-motivated staff. This report summarises the available research and looks at many of the approaches which have been used to strengthen national, regional or local practice.

The report also recognises that the quality of ECEC provision is highly dependent on the professionalism, competence and commitment of staff working in the sector – and it is therefore increasingly important that there is continued support for staff training and development. This report therefore proposes a set of core competences for ECEC assistants, core practitioners and ECEC leaders. In addition, it looks at the wide range of practices which are currently being used to strengthen the initial and continuing education and training of ECEC staff.

“A fair start for every child in Europe” Campaign – Case study Bulgaria – Breaking Down Barriers to Quality ECEC for Roma Children in Sofia

The Equal Opportunities Initiative Association (EOIA) has been working with Roma communities in Sofia since 2008, helping to increase enrolment rates of young Roma children in pre-school. Today they collaborate closely with local authorities and national government, ensuring that Roma parents are consulted on issues of access and quality of early childhood services.

Blighted Lives: Romani Children in State Care

This five-country wide round of research into the situation of Roma children in state care marks the latest in a decade-long series of interventions by the European Roma Rights Centre. The research covers four EU Member States: Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Romania, and Slovakia, as well as neighbouring Moldova. As was mentioned in the introduction, the plight of these most vulnerable children, and the issue of their fundamental rights and wellbeing, did not register as a priority when the EU Framework for National Roma Integration Strategies was launched in 2011.

The publication of this research followed the launch of the European Commission’s EU Roma strategic framework for equality, inclusion and participation for 2020–2030. It also coincided with the finding by the European Committee of Social Rights (ECSR) in November 2020, that holds the Czech Republic responsible for large-scale and discriminatory placement of children with disabilities and Romani children in early childhood care institutions.

Key Data on Early Childhood Education and Care 2019

Only one third of children aged 0-3 has access to center-based early childhood education and care (ECEC) settings.

The report provides indicators on the key quality areas of governance, access, staff, educational guidelines as well as evaluation and monitoring. Cross-cutting these key areas, it presents a child-centered approach, with special attention being paid to the inter-relatedness of policies in different areas. The importance of inclusiveness in education is also stressed as high quality ECEC is considered to be one of the best ways to increase equity and equality in society.

Part one provides policymakers, researchers and parents with comparative information on the current ECEC policies across Europe. Part two gives an overview of the key features of national ECEC systems accompanied by a diagram of their structure.

The scope of the report is wide, covering center-based and regulated home-based provision in both the public and private sectors in the 38 European countries (43 education systems) participating in the EU’s Erasmus+ programme. It includes the 28 Member States of the European Union as well as Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Switzerland, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Norway, Serbia and Turkey.